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Albums

At Folsom Prison

Johnny Cash - At Folsom Prison
RIAA Certification:
3x Platinum
Peak Position on Billboard 200:
13
Weeks on Billboard 200 Chart:
124

Tracklist

= Released as a Single
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1. Folsom Prison Blues (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
2. Dark As a Dungeon (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
3. I Still Miss Someone (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
4. Cocaine Blues (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
5. 25 Minutes to Go (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
6. Orange Blossom Special (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
7. Long Black Veil (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
8. Send a Picture of Mother (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
9. The Wall (Live)
00:30
Lyrics Watch Video
10. Dirty Old Egg-Sucking Dog (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
11. Flushed from the Bathroom of Your Heart (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
12. Jackson (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
13. Give My Love to Rose (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
14. I Got Stripes (Live)
00:30
Lyrics Watch Video
15. Green, Green Grass of Home (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
16. Greystone Chapel (Live)
00:30
Lyrics
The Wall (At Folsom Prison)
  • Release Date: May 01, 1968
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I Got Stripes (At Folsom Prison)
  • Release Date: May 01, 1968
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On January 13, 1968, Johnny Cash walked into California’s Folsom State Prison and made popular music history. The choicest cuts from the two shows he recorded that day merged to become At Folsom Prison, a multimillion-selling album produced by Bob Johnston that unveiled a startling portrait of American prison life and energized Cash’s career. The most popular album of Cash’s career to that point, it soared to the top of the charts and paved Cash’s way to international stardom.

At Folsom Prison‘s rebellious attitude and plea for compassion for the imprisoned (articulated in Cash’s original liner notes and the pouring out of his soul on stage) intersected with the spirit of 1968, finding a place next to figures such as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy who urged Americans to reach out to the disenfranchised and next to young Americans taking to the streets to protest war and inequality. Curious music fans and socially-conscious critics across the nation were magnetized.

In Folsom’s wake, Cash became an international ambassador of country music, prison reform spokesman, and counter-culture hero. Few albums had ever proved so influential. Decades after its initial release, historians and critics continue to count At Folsom Prison among the classic albums of the 1960s. As daughter Rosanne Cash observes, Cash went into Folsom Prison and “came into the light.”

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